Talked to former employee about how work was going, made me glad I was not working there any more :)

Had coffee with a former employee who remains at the company where we worked together.  It sounds like the company is still a mess, and mired in metrics hell.  For example, each Rep has to find 6-8 leads a week, and they are measured on how well the delivery team covers the leads since (in theory) if the lead is good then delivery will do good work on it.  This is shocking – the delivery team isn’t doing good work and usually blames the leads, since they don’t really have any accountability (again, if the leads don’t advance it is the rep’s fault).  

Meanwhile, there are twice a week meetings where each rep’s leads are reviewed, they are given action items on each lead then questioned about the these items at the next meeting.  So there is a perpetual current of stress that begins with the 6-8 leads and runs down sh** creek from there.  

Oh my god.  What a hell hole, and a sign that the company is run by a former data-obsessesed engineer and not an actual good business person.  It makes me veeeerrrrryyyyy glad I don’t work there anymore.  How can you possibly be strategic and thorough — and possibly enjoy your job — when you are obsessed all the time about meeting one-size-fits-all metrics developed by people with no common sense?  🙂 

Advertisements
Talked to former employee about how work was going, made me glad I was not working there any more :)

Am remembering how it felt to be in high school

I loved high school.  My mom and dad were yuppies working their way up the corporate ladder so were fairly high strung, but I loved wearing jeans and tennis shoes to school, hanging out with friends and peers during the day, then returning home in the midafternoon to eat, play basketball and hang out with friends.  I was pretty savvy with saving money and liked to work double shifts on weekends so I had the week to just hang out.  I need to get back to that again. To simple feelings.  To getting to work early, going with the flow, then cutting out on time to hang out at home.  How do I get back there?  Is it possible?  I hope so…  It seems like I should be able to manage work so it does not consume my thoughts all the time.  

Am remembering how it felt to be in high school

Holy Cow, there is no tolerance in Seattle right now…

WHen I was a kid, it was rare when I heard a car horn in Seattle.  In fact, Seattleites were somewhat notorious for not honking.  But I honestly can’t say when the last time was that I walked two blocks without at least one driver blasting the horn at a fellow driver.  Then today, when trying to look how high the Ballard Bridge was, I came across a long series of posts where drivers and boaters are ranting at each other about when and/or if drawbridges should open, and it was pretty toxic and personal in spots.  There is zero tolerance right now for each other.  I don’t blame people, I blame how incredibly maxed out we all are right now.  We are online all the time, we are doing the work by ourselves that two people used to do, and many of us are earning no more — or even less – than we were 10 years ago while costs conintue to go up.  We are all stressed, and of course it is easy to take it out on everyone else all around us.  Wild stuff.  Sad stuff.

BTW From what I could tell, we can survive a jump from the Ballard Bridge. I was curious, because I remember back in 1991 when a car with two unfortunate teens went over the bridge and into the water below, and I always wondered if someone had jumped off the bridge into the water below to attempt to save the girls (from what I read, it wouldn’t have mattered as they likely would have died from the crash itself), would the jumpers have survived?  I think they would have… I still think about those girls several times a month when I am driving over the bridge…

Holy Cow, there is no tolerance in Seattle right now…

Wouldn’t want to be Bill Gates today – he looks 90 years old.

Bill Gates is worth 90B dollars, but he also looks 90 years old at the fairly young age of 60.  I personally wouldn’t want that much money if I looked as old and tired as he does at such a young age (something I started noticing 10 years ago).  He — and others — might disagree, but when I look at him I see a man whose infamous work weeks in his 20s and 30s have extracted a heavy toll on him.  

On a related note, he is now worth 90B.  That is nuts.  Every single one of us in the 99% should be ashamed that we’ve allowed our government to allow one of us to have 90B, when there are so few people with anything at all and so many of our social programs have evaporated the past few decades.  Please note, I hold myself just as responsible as anyone else on this.  

Wouldn’t want to be Bill Gates today – he looks 90 years old.

Belgium

We took a 10-mile bike tour through Rougge, Belgium.  We learned that Belgium is a fairly new country — 19th century — and prior to this was owned and influenced by other countries who appreciated its ideal location as a port.  In fact, according to our guide it was the busiest port in Europe for centuries.  The country has three languages, including French, German and Dutch, and was also influenced by Vikings (who founded it as a port) and the Spaniards, who introduced Beglians to Chocolate.  Sister K learned on her tour that a massive port was built in 1912 then destroyed 2 years later in WW1, then rebuilt in 1937 and destroyed again in World War 2.  But now the port is the most important industry for the area…

We started out in the timeless, quaint city before riding along the canals, stopping at a windmill, then riding out into the farmlands.  We rode over a stone bridge, then stopped in a pub, where we consumed a delicious ale and were told that beer was important for safety reasons because in years past the water was not safe to drink.  Brougge is int he process of constructing an underground pipe that will delivery — wooo!! — fresh beer along a several kilometer line.  

We could see the different types of architecture along the city, and could also see in the country how that part of the land had been reclaimed from the sea (what used to be the beach now lies several kilometers from the water through reclaimed land — a common theme in several of our stops, including The Netherlands.

On the way, our guide asked why I was taking so many photos — was I a journalist?  No, I said, I loved Belgium so wanted to capture the moment.  Why? He asked.  Because it seems low stress, I said.  But, like so many Europeans I talked to on this trip, he said quality of life today is not as great as it would seem, that his daughter commutes 1.5 hours to work each way, struggles to find time to spend time with her kids between work and business of life, and that the department he retired from now has 3 people doing the work that 5 once did.  I am starting to think that demanding more with less and ofr less is a common theme not just in the US, but across the world, and that people as a whole are reaching a breaking point, what with all this inequality spread throughout the world (the top 1% having so much and the rest of the people having to work so hard over so little with very little security or time to enjoy life).

All that said, I loved Belgium.  It was peaceful, charming and scenic.  

Belgium

Happiness is putting a human face to a frustrating problem

Yesterday, the bus – which run every 15 minutes – was 45 minutes late. I was frustrated as heck. Then the bus arrived, and the driver was stressed. “The last bus didn’t show,” he said as I climbed on. Poor guy – I am sure he was taking abuse all along the route. Suddenly, instead of feeling frustrated I felt sorry for the driver, and hoped the missing bus (driver) was okay. I was able to relax and enjoy the sunny day on the bus ride home. Empathy has its perks 🙂

Happiness is putting a human face to a frustrating problem