How do we plan to take care of people after the machines are running the world

With a story I read today that pizza delivery places may start using self-driving cars, my first thought is another job that is taken away from people.  In Sci-Fi movies and stories, machines doing all the work means humans have free time, bu the reality is it means 99% of humans work more since they can’t find work and the money crated from those machines pools at the top.  They need to tax the shit out of machine automation for social programs.

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How do we plan to take care of people after the machines are running the world

Why humans are doomed to extinction – because our own s*** don’t stink

I have been bussing to appointments today, and am noticing how especially awful traffic is as people drive for Christmas-related reasons. Despite all the fears in Seattle of global warming, so many of us hop in cars. We hop on planes, we drive places, we eat meat (which contributes a ton to global warming), we order things from Amazon that have to be shipped from far away. Human beings are not able to control themselves until the crisis is real and immediate – we fear global warming and say we need to control it, but don’t as a mass take steps as individuals to control it. And buy the time the Earth can no longer sustain humans it will be too late. In short, we are doomed to extinction in the years ahead. We will be like those early forms of life that helped create oxygen but died off because of oxygen – we are creating global warming and will die from it while blaming the republicans and Chinese for global warming while riding in our cars, planes and boats.

Why humans are doomed to extinction – because our own s*** don’t stink

The human being’s penchant to ignore (literal) warning signs…

I am reading Bill Bryson’s book and he mentions in 1992 a young man ignored posted warnings signs and swam in jellyfish-infested waters, and was stung by lethal jellyfish.  He was still screaming in pain even after heavily doped with morphine nad passing out. 

We all do it sometimes.  We cross the street when the light is red.  We walk across the grass when a sign states, “Stay off the grass.”  We eat food with fructose despite the warnings not to eat fructose.  We smoke although the packages warns about the dangers of smoking.  In other words, we disregard — literally — warning signs.

Why is it we ignore signs sometimes?  Both benign signs and the “danger” signs.  What in the human brain makes us ignore the signs at different (individualized) levels of comfort?  

Would we be less likely to ignore signs if the signs also said, “This means you?” My favorite weather forecast was six years ago in The Sierra Nevadas, which forecasted heavy snow and the official National Weather Service forecast added, “There may be a loss of life if travelers drive or venture out into the snow.”  If signs spelled out in clear letters the potential consequences — and examples of when those consequences happened — would people still ignroe them?  Don’t know, but somehow I wouldn’t be surprised if still quite a few people ignored them.  I’ve love to see every warning sign add the words, “This means you” at the bottom 🙂  

PS I am pretty good about not jaywalking — unless there are extreme extenuating circumstances, I don’t do it.  Partially because I worry about cars I might not see, or cars that might turn into me unexpectedly, but partly too because I feel exposed and naked when crossing against a “don’t walk” sign.  Just like I would never cheat on my wife even if she would never find out, I don’t like to cross against red lights even when no one is around.  🙂  

The human being’s penchant to ignore (literal) warning signs…

People I met the last few days

A woman is from Croatia, and needs the sun and heat (we’ve been cloudy and cool).  Another woman is from Panama City.  A retired CPA from New Jersey is proud of his son, who runs a warehouse for Amazon. A couple from Sacramento California has a 1 year old granddaughter in Florida, and love to visit Lake Tahoe; they took a 21-day cruise, which was too long although they liked there were washing machines on the boat (most boats don’t have laundry machines, which is a challenge 🙂 ).  A woman from Dominica recently lost her fiance to liver failure, and her two children (13,8) stay with their grandparents so she can work and send money home.  Our waiter is from the Phillipines, and has four young children at home.  Christopher, an attendant, remembered my t-shirt from the previous day and called out to me, later I saw him talking at length with two attractive women.   

People I met the last few days