Am thinking of that college kid who made the job application video that went viral

Was it 10 years ago?  When the college kid made a video showing his achievements but which had clearly been editied. It showed him bench pressing like a bazillion pounds and zipping tennis balls a thousand miles an hour and similar achievements, and he sent it to prospective employers to demonstrate what he can do when he puts his mind to it.  A malicious soul in HR shared the video with friends and it went viral and he was mocked a lot, even in the press.  What an unfortunate thing that was.  I admire a kid willing to put himself out there to find a job, and what a shame that a 22 year old is held up to the world to be mocked.  I wonder where he is today, and hope he is doing well and is a good person and uses that experience to show compassion for others.

Am thinking of that college kid who made the job application video that went viral

Passively and unexpectedly interviewed with a competitor

Passively interviewed with a competitor.  In my defense, I didn’t start as an interview – I thought we were having coffee to share ideas and intelligence.  He asked if I’d meet with his teams, which I did.  Think I’m staying where I am, but it was a moral victory for me – as someone intensely focused on my job at hand, I’ve never been good at passively interviewing — I’m either all in or all out.  But it was valuable — I learned somethings and got some ideas, plus built some connections if my current situation heads south. What I observed:

They are doubling down on a large account in the area that other Suppliers are moving away from due to downward pricing pressure.

Their Sales VP reads Data/KPIs right to left – starts at quota and moves backward through the metrics from there.  I like that phrase — if a rep is at quota (the far right on most reports), you stop there; if they are short, you move to the next metric on the left.  I realize too I need to build a stronger wall that separates my team’s culture from the intense micromanagement culture of our HQ.

They hired several new VPs.  One is implementing a re-seller program, another is restructuring the sales team and a third is leading the sales efforts.  In the meantime, they have tenured VPs doing their normal things.  I can see the beginnings of a turf war, and don’t want to get in the middle of that.

Finally, they would have to fiture out a position for me, and the Sales VP asked me why I would take a step down (from DIrector to IC).  That was news to me, but more than anything else I’ve realized lately that although I love selling and being an IC, stepping down is a big move and should be with the right company and the right opporutnity.  That is, it’s not something to be taken lightly.

Passively and unexpectedly interviewed with a competitor