I absolutely love  when people who used to work for me stay in touch!!

Ond of the things I try to be respectful of as a manager is that when someone from my team leaves, I stress that I’d love to stay in touch (unless they were not a good person and I showed them the door), but I don’t pressure them to stay in touch and give them their distance (although once in a great while I might send a random note that simply says hello an dhope you are well).  So when my team reaches out to me, especially as the months go by, I feel flattered and happy.  The past two weeks not one not two but three people I used to manage reached out to me to ask if I’d like to have coffee/lunch and catch up, and the thing is they know I am not in a position to hire right now which means it is reasonably genuine.  I love hearing from my ex-team, since I truly care about them!

I absolutely love  when people who used to work for me stay in touch!!

Read about Nick Saban in The System – I respect him, but I would not be him.

Nick Saban is highly respected in the football ranks, and I read about him a little bit in The System and other sources (Google Search)…  

He is known for his attention to detail – if a player is expected to put his hand on the line, he puts his hand on the line — period.  He highly values conditioning, and has four strength and training coaches at Alabama while having intense conditioning work outs.  He emphasizes that recdruiting starts with deciding who they should recruit, and has certain profiles he looks for.  He is highly engaged on the field, making the rounds, and expects perfection. He is not afraid to bawl out a coach for not expecting perfection from the players, which in turn keeps the coaches tuned into the players.  He is efficient, and has coaches down the ranks who scrutinize specific aspects of film looking for trends and schemes.  He also flat out understands football.  

I have fairly high energy and I like people who have high energy and good work ethic.  But I have always been 80-90% on detail, figuring that for most things 80-90% is good enough,// and I’ll compensate for the 10% with extra work effort.  In all honesty, I could not — and would not — want to be Nick Saban, to man the details so closely in a football game, to spend most of my life worrying about a football game.  I have a hard time taking life — and silly man-made details in life — that seriously, and enjoy a little more balance in life.  

But I do respect that in NIck Saban.  But then again, I am not sure that means he should be paid 5M a year.  No one should be paid 5M a year.  🙂

Read about Nick Saban in The System – I respect him, but I would not be him.

“Manager” does not have the same impact as “Teacher” and “Coach” (Had a conversation with L, an employee now a manager elsewhere…”)

L was one of my Sales Reps.  During the time she reported to me, she was agreeable and enthusiastic.  Her texts and emails to me were a lot of exclamation points and expressions of gratitude.

Now she is a Buying Manager for one of our clients.  And it is funny communicating with her.  The exclamation points and the enthusiasm have gone.  I’d never ask her for business in a million years (that’s not my style), and honestly have never made an unsolicted call to her, but she did call and offer us business which was nice.  But when she talks to me she has that robotic and neutral voice that so many Buying Managers have.  

Honestly, it’s disheatening in many ways.  I could care less about her business, but I do invest a lot of time and energy into my employees (I truly care) and I hear things like “Best boss ever” (which I take with a grain of salt considering they have a vested interest to say that when working for me) but 9 times out of 10 when they leave I don’t get/hear much from them again.  

When I taught and when I coached, it was different.  Even years later, my grown students still saw me as teacher and former players saw me as coach.  But management doesn’t mean the same  – its impacts aren’t as permanent.

I am fighting the urge to wonder why I care about my team so much.  But then again, I do owe it to them the do the best I can while they work for me.  And recently I was contacted by a company who’d spoken to my former employees who’d mentioned I was a favorite boss of most people who report to me.  So maybe the impact is there, just not visible.  And I don’t do it for the visibility, I do it because I care.

Human nature is funny.  

“Manager” does not have the same impact as “Teacher” and “Coach” (Had a conversation with L, an employee now a manager elsewhere…”)

Amazed at how many great coaches struggle(d) in their first seasons

  • Pete Carroll was 2-5 in his first games at USC and everyone wanted him fired.  
  • John Capileri had several underwhelming seasons when he started at UMass.
  • John Wooden coached nearly 20 years before winning his first title. 
  • Bill Belichek was fired from his first coaching assignment in Cleveland before taking over the NFL.
  • It took Sparky Anderson 5 years to correct the Detroit Tigers.

It takes leaders time to figure things out, sometimes, especially on an already sinking ship.  A very smart Owner/Chairman gives leaders a little bit of time to tinker and right the ship before tossing the captain overboard.  

Amazed at how many great coaches struggle(d) in their first seasons