I love it when someone is sprinting for a bus – and makes it!

I always feel happy and relieved for them. I probably see that every day when I ride the bus. I just watched a guy run a block after the bus and made it!! He has an extra 20 minutes for his day now :).

Advertisements
I love it when someone is sprinting for a bus – and makes it!

Happiness is putting a human face to a frustrating problem

Yesterday, the bus – which run every 15 minutes – was 45 minutes late. I was frustrated as heck. Then the bus arrived, and the driver was stressed. “The last bus didn’t show,” he said as I climbed on. Poor guy – I am sure he was taking abuse all along the route. Suddenly, instead of feeling frustrated I felt sorry for the driver, and hoped the missing bus (driver) was okay. I was able to relax and enjoy the sunny day on the bus ride home. Empathy has its perks 🙂

Happiness is putting a human face to a frustrating problem

Who would think missing the bus was a good thing?

Thursday night after a 12-hour day at the office.  The bus was one block ahead, boarding the last of the passengers. I knew that if I broke into a dead sprint I would catch it. Instead, I let it go. The last passenger stepped on, the hazards clicked off, and bus rolled away. Who’d think that was a good thing?  I did.

First, I was proud of myself for not running after the bus (doctor’s orders).

Second, I used my the lessons/tools I was given in post-illness therapy – that is, I didn’t let missing the bus get me into the “if I hadn’t gotten lung disease I would’ve caught that bus” funk I would’ve felt in those first six months after beating the disease. Instead, I just admired the twilight for 15 minutes until the next bus arrived…

I love that therapy has taught me to appreciate what I have (miraculously stable health, a beautifull twilight evening) rather than what I lost (ability to sprint after a bus).  That is the best part of my post illness therapy — a year later I am still able to use the tools I learned.

Who would think missing the bus was a good thing?

Loving the bus

Nearly every day I don’t have client meetings, I take the bus. It means a minimum of 10 blocks of walking (5 blocks each way) and instead of worrying about the road, I stare at my phone, stare out the window, cloes my eyes and think or (best of all) close my eyes and don’t think.  So I’m more fit, less stressed and promoting less traffic and less fossil fuels.  What is not to like?

Whenn I was in high school, I was bussed across the city as part of the desegregation initiative, which means there were a number of times I took public transportation nearly 2 hours.  Those were simple times, and riding the bus today — as a 40-something — takes me back to those times.

Loving the bus