Started Reading The Art of Racing In the Rain last night

Started reading the kindle version of The Art of Racing in the Rain for no particular reason last night, although it has been a book I’ve been told I should read for several years.  Finished 5% of the book before I got sleepy and turned out the light.  So far, the dog is old and nearing the end of his life.  His owner is now a single dad, and the dog has been with him since he first met his wife, had a daughter, and the wife passed away from illness.  The man loves car racing, and the dog too now loves it, and reflects on the 1993 Grand Prix which was won in the rain, and how his owner is good at racing in the rain because the key is to forget the past and just race in the moment.  We learn the dog may be nearing the end of his life, but looks forward to it because he doesnt’ want to be a burden to his owner plus knows from a documentary that after his dog life he will be a human, and can’t wait to be human with their amazing tongues, which allow them to chew their food and to form speech.  To be continued…

Started Reading The Art of Racing In the Rain last night

Read interesting things about Plymouth settlers

Am reading “Fur, Fortune and Empire” and am finding it to be an interesting book.  For exampple, the settlers on Plymouth were more or less coerced at the final momnent to sign a new and less favorable agreement with their employer, and although they sought religious freedom their journey was paid for by investors who had them focus first and foremost on trading for valuable Beaver pelts with the Native Americans.  The company that paid for their voyage was led by a sociopath, who didn’t give enough goods and supplies to the pilgrims, and made unreasonable demands of them.  Also, they were supposed to settle farther south than Plymouth (and those lands had better fur trapping locations) but settled in Plymouth for safety reasons, then virtually hunted the Beaver to extinction in that area.  Finally, they expected to find a thriving Native settlement in Plymouth, but found it nearly abandoned – most of the Natives had been wiped out by the diseases  that Europeans brought with them (and wiped out much of all the native populations in the Americas).

Read interesting things about Plymouth settlers

Re-reading Sallis’s “Drive” and again loving it, and I love when script writers combine events in a novel to create a new movie experience.

After watching Drive last week I am re-reading Sallis’s “Drive.”  It is a somewhat obtuse writing style, and I had it read it twice the first time through in 2012 (possibly because I was foggy headed on prednisone) but it paid dividends.  Now, 4 years later, I am a third of the way through it is very good.  And like a few other novels-turned-films (such as A Thin Red Line), am loving the skill of the script writer to combine and rearrange characters and events to create a new experience in the movie!  

The book opens with the motel scene where Blanche dies, but doesn’t come back to it for several chapters.  We learn that Shannon was a stunt driver who befriended a run away Driver (who was a foster child to parents in Phoenix) and dies during a stunt.  Driver spends a lot of time eating in and drinking in local hispanic eateries, and philosophical character.  The pawn shop was a separate incident than what kicked off the battle with the mob in the movie…  (More to follow)…

As I’ve mentioned before, the movie is a superb work of art. 🙂

Re-reading Sallis’s “Drive” and again loving it, and I love when script writers combine events in a novel to create a new movie experience.