Want to see “Good time”

Good Time  is running at our local theater – I love seedy films and this has good reviews.  I’d love to see it!

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Want to see “Good time”

The Movie “Dark Water” not my favorite

Watched Dark Water, a Japanese ghost film where a newly divorced mother and her young daughter move into a building haunted by the ghost of a girl who drowned there.  It felt a little long, a litte slow, a little predictable and a little unreal (e.g. Where were the neighbors in their building?).  Very meh. ūüė¶

The Movie “Dark Water” not my favorite

Absolute pleasure to watch “Under the Shadow”

Wife M, Daughter L and I watched Under the Shadow last night.  On the surface level, it was a scary movie (although not too over-the-top scary) that got scarier and creepier.  But on a deeper level, like “Moonlight” and “Get Out” and “Babadook” I loved its message.  We have a mother who was an aspiring medical student before leaving school to join her revolution; because of that she can’t pursue her dream (ostracized) later.  Her husband, instead of fighting for her, says “maybe it is for the best.”  As the movie goes on, and the Djinni take over the buliding, she becomes more isolated as a mother.  Her husband is gone, her community slowly leaves, her workout tape is gone, her medical book is locked away then sacrificed for her daughter’s doll, she is told by her husband she is incapable of making her own decision (to stay) then when she decides to leave rather than leave she must stay (“if you love me”) and help her daughter find her beloved doll.  When she escapes all this at last by breaking down the wall with her daughter, the book and the doll stay behind, indicating you can run but you can’t ever escape.  

Oh my goodness, what a message this is to be a woman in a man’s world.  What a powerful (but entertaining) movie.  

Brilliant.  Why wasn’t this nominated for an Oscar??

Absolute pleasure to watch “Under the Shadow”

Mulholland Drive an awesome movie

I watched Mulholland Drive (2001) for the first time last night.  Sensational.  Strange, beautiful, intriguing, mysterious and deep.  Follows a beautiful young woman suffering from Amnesia, her new friend trying to help her remember, a hip movie director fighting off corruption/extortion, and a rugged hit man before suddenly pivoting and showing all the same characters in a new way.

There is lots of debate about the movie’s meaning (with some warnings not to think¬†too hard), but I believe it is Diane/Betty’s brief journey in hell, almost a post-death dream. ¬†The movie opens up with swing dancers then an imposed image of Betty smiling before cutting to the presumed doom of Camilla (preceded by imposed car lights within car lights, like ¬†a dream within a dream). ¬†When Betty steps off the plane with the old couple, when everything is dreamy and pink, then the old couple drive off with demonic laughter (they reappear later) makes me think they are imps; other imps is¬†the god-like figure controlling the fate of the director we learn later was a source of Diane’s jealousy. ¬†So many other things: the blue in the background, the pink paint splatters (like Betty’s pink sweater, lipstick, flowers, etc.) keep reinforcing my belief that Betty is dead and is being shown a new fate. ¬†The dream wakes up with “Wake up little lady” by the Cowboy. ¬†Such a wonderful movie – like¬†Point Blank (earlier) meets Drive (later) and Neon Demons (later).

I’d love to go back and watch the scene with Bob the Director, where he seems to spout nonsense that maybe isn’t nonsense taken in context of everything else.

I *loved* the casting all the way around. ¬†(I’ve always thought a Grace Kelly and a young Jude Law were the¬†most beautiful people I’ve seen on screen – Laura Harring is on par with them. ¬†The camera loved her physical beauty).

Mulholland Drive an awesome movie

Loved, loved, loved (!) the movie “Fire at Sea!” Notes:

I love movies (like Moonlight) where the director believes in the intelligence of his/her audience while telling a powerful story and delivering a powerful message. ¬†For me, “Fire at Sea” was that way. ¬†It was a movie that was comfortable delivery subtle comments and with letting a scene slowly unfold, where it is comfortable showing the doctor give an ultrasound for five minutes or just showing four workers stare out at sea. ¬†It is a wonderful, powerful movie and the most beautiful film that way since “The Great Beauty.” ¬†Some observations (with some spoilers):

  • The beginning of the movie we see the boy making a weapon and hunting birds, but at the end of the movie he is merely singing to the bird – shows our ability to change our ways.
  • The doctor makes a comment that it is the¬†responsibility of all of us to help the immigrants (who are dying).
  • The doctor, during the ultrasound, can’t make out the sex of the second child since they are too intertwined. ¬†“But don’t worry, we’ll get it.” ¬†He patiently, patiently seeks the sex. ¬†I see that scene as stating we are all intertwined and too intertwined, and it will take patience and diligence and care and perserverence to resolve our/this problem. ¬†I also see the scene later in the movie where the woman takes a full five minutes to carefully make her bed as again emphasizing that things take time and persistence and patience.
  • The boy is having struggles rowing – his friend throws his a lifeline so he is not crushed by the boats, then rows him to safety. ¬†That is, we all need a helping hand and we need to offer a helping hand.
  • The boy has a lazy eye, so he works to correct his vision from 20/100 to 20/30 by wearing the eye patch. Later, when he is sea sick he is told to to go the sea when there are high waves to get his sea stomach. ¬†That is, we have a problem (the refugee crisis) but we can fix it with work.
  • The woman wishes for a little health that day, like we all want to be healthy and happy (including the refugees). ¬†It’s not too much to ask.

I’d love to watch this movie again – these are just a few observations off the top of my head a day later and I am sure there are more.

It is a tragic tale but one that also offers help and a nudge for us to help.  I wish we in the US were helping more (at a time when Donald Trump wants to do less!) РI am going to write my congress person about that.  Those poor souls Рand the scene of the people dead at the bottom of the boat was awful but moving, like watching the Holocaust images in some ways (and to the people who died in such misery, the result is the same).

The movie makes me want to move to Sicily ūüôā

Finally, it has been a great year for documentaries. ¬†OJ: Made in America, 13th and I Am Not Your Negro were all wonderful and deserving; my vote for Oscar this year though is this one (“Fire at Sea”).

Loved, loved, loved (!) the movie “Fire at Sea!” Notes:

One good movie, one meh movie

On Friday evening, Wife M and I¬†watched Hacksaw Ridge with sister K. ¬†It has been highly touted and nominated for a Best Picture Oscar, with some calling it a modern Saving Private Ryan. ¬†To that, I say: seriously? ¬†The thing about Saving Private Ryan is that it took an entire new look at World War 2 using advances in cinematography; I saw SPR¬†twice in theaters and both times the audience was stunned into silence; everyone stayed until the credits were over and the lights went on, and you could’ve heard a pin drop as people filed out. ¬†I couldn’t sleep that first night I saw it in 1997, I was so disturbed by what I’d seen. ¬†But Hacksaw Ridge adds nothing really new, and changed some of the facts of the real story that the real Dodd so desperately wanted unchanged for Hollywood that he refused to sell the movie rights for many years. ¬†Other than the Dodd family, I didn’t feel attached to the characters, and sometimes I suppressed an eye roll (like when the dad broke in¬†at the perfectly correct time, or when Dodd pulled Vince Vaughn at full speed on his rain slicker while Vaughn machined gunned down an entire Japanese platoon behind him). ¬†Flags of our Fathers, Saving Private Ryan, the Deer Hunter, A Thin Red Line, Paths of Glory, etc. etc. etc. were far more creative movies – I give this one a C for telling a decent story decently, but in no way was it a Movie of the Year candidate. On the plus side, I loved the performance of Dodd’s dad, who was the “villain” in The Matrix and the Elf king in Lord of the Rings.

But yesterday wife M and I watched Tony Erdman at the Uptown. ¬†The film was nominated for Best Foreign Film. ¬†It was wonderful! ¬†Three hours long but didn’t feel like it, with a quirky prankster father who is able to finally reach his career-driven and unhappy daughter. ¬†The theater laughed out loud for much of the movie at the quirky dad, and I thought the scene where the daughter struggles in her dress, then out of her dress, then in then out then finally just steps into the party naked was wonderful and brilliant. ¬†I loved the performances, and really liked the daughter’s performance since I thought she did a good job of looking uncomfortable while trying to seem composed.

Wife M went out with girlfriends a few nights ago and they made a plan for a group Academy Award night ¬†where we’ll watch the Oscars together. ¬†Fun!!!

 

 

 

One good movie, one meh movie

I love depressing movies with hope

I continue to think on how much I disliked the movie Lion and the character in it.  Why?  Because I like people who perservere, and don’t like being around mopey people.  

Take Casablanca.  Here we have a heartbroken character who continues to suffer, but he suffers in silence while still running a bar. Elsa also is heartbroken, but tries her best to move forward.  The prince, held in a prison camp before escaping and loses his home (and realizes his wife shacked up with another dude when she thought he was dead) but continues to press on.  Resilience!

Or in Manchester by the Sea.  A brother is given 5-10 years to live and is a single dad, but continues on.  Lee suffers a horrible tragedy, but still presses on.  Everyone presses on the best they can.

But in Lion, the main character wallows. He quits his job, and drops his girlfriend and spends his days wallowing in a dark room clicking at a laptop.  Depressing!  I hate that.

I also have found that I don’t like watching the character Jesse in Breaking Bad.  I like that he is nonviolent and actually a pretty good kid, but there are many scenes where he just sits and wallows.  Again, I hate that.  I find myself fast forwarding through his scenes when I rewatch an episode.

So I am realizing I love grim movies where people press on.  I think that comes from my childhood, where I had a mom whose family suffered from debilitating depression, which was difficult to see, but also a dad who refuses to ever look at the dark side, which was a powerful example for me.  I don’t blame depressed people for being depressed or even suffering so much they can’t function – depression is an awful disease that can’t be helped.  But that doesn’t mean I want to watch it on the big screen. 

I love depressing movies with hope