When a VP is fired

My boss’s boss was likely let go today – we received a sudden announcement that he was gone.  Everyone on the team is shaken.  What does this mean for them?  It is like someone died.  FOr me, i like and trust my boss, so am staying the course.  I will work my plan as approved, check in with him and trust his guidance/feedback.  This is why it is so important to have a trustworthy boss – 3 years ago when I did not trust my boss and we went through this, I couldn’t just trust him and keep my head down.

When a VP is fired

My last trip to BC the Red Sox won the World Series for the first time since 1918

I was in BC when the Red Sox won the World Series in 2004 for their first series win in decades – the last time before today I was in BC.  What I remember about that game was how crowded the bar was.  The year before in 2003, we tried to watch the Yankees play in the World Series but all local bars were tuned into HOckey Games, but in 2004 every Bar was tuned into the Red Sox game since the anticipation was so high.  It was fun to be a part of.

My last trip to BC the Red Sox won the World Series for the first time since 1918

The Patriot got me a little hooked on folk music and have been enjoying listening to Tim Hardin this weekend

The hero in The Patriot dreams of being a Folk Singer, and expressed himself here and there in wonderful impromptu performances in Amsterdam.  Those scenes got me hooked on Folk Music this weekend, and I am don’t know that there was a greater Folk musician than Tim Hardin, something I’m really coming to believe over this past weekend of listening to various artists.  A few years ago, Rolling Stone did a nice piece on him:

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/tribute-album-and-biopic-mark-revival-for-songwriter-dylan-once-called-greatest-20130213?utm_source=email

The Patriot got me a little hooked on folk music and have been enjoying listening to Tim Hardin this weekend

Things I really loved to do as a kid that I could care less about now (how is it that the brain changes like that)

The following list are things that I really really loved to do as a kid – really looked forward to it to the point I couldn’t sleep the night before out of anticipation — that I could really care less about now:

  • Read the baseball box scores.
  • Bowling.
  • Fishing (actually hate the idea of killing or hurting fish).
  • Golf.
  • Read the comic pages.
  • Comic books.
  • War movies.
  • Watch college basketball.

Things that I still love to do as much as a kid:

  • Shoot baskets.
  • Board games (classics).
  • Poker.
  • Riding a bike.
  • Passively listen to wise/smart people in conversation (sitting at the grown ups table).

To be continued.

Things I really loved to do as a kid that I could care less about now (how is it that the brain changes like that)

Love how complicated a character Jimmy on Better Call Saul is

Here is a guy willing to break his own self-centered brother he loves to get a favorable ruling, who strings old people along to manipulate the sh*t out of them, who is a true con man – but also a guy who will go to extreme lengths to restore a lonely old woman’s friendship with his friends and who cares for his brother.  He is a complicated guy and it is all very believable.  Love it.

Love how complicated a character Jimmy on Better Call Saul is

I grew up in a family where teasing was normal, and it took me a lot of years to lose this habit

My family teased each other, but not in a fun way.  Instead, it was in a way where everyone laughed except the person being teased, who felt like sh*t.  When my grandpa made gravy that turned out too thick, we mocked him ruthlessly for years.  When my cousin locked himself out of the house naked by accident (long story), that also was a ruthless mocking for years.  Again, it wasn’t lighthearted – it was fairly ruthless and mean spirited in a “teasing” way.  I took that with me to school – the teasing and the mean comments and the tolerating other people teasing me. And I ended up with friends who teased each other ruthlessly and rarely (never) stood up for one another or complimented one another.   It took me at least 10 or 20 years into adulthood, but I was able to shed that instinct of teasing.  Thank goodness.   I am thinking of this right now as I think of how when my great uncle passed away in 1985, and the family was upset, and I was mocking them for caring.  “Like any of us should be surprised the old fart died,” I kidded my mom at one point.  Crazy. I can’t imagine doing that now.

I grew up in a family where teasing was normal, and it took me a lot of years to lose this habit