The best part about surviving a (potentially) fatal disease is not life – it’s compassion.

I did something I would have thought unthinkable to me 5 years ago – gave a hungry person two protein bars and 10 dollars…  He didn’t say thank you, but then again I didn’t do it for the thank you – I did it because he was hungry and few things are worse than hunger….  It has been nearly 5 years since I survived lung disease with a 50 percent mortality rate, and I just can’t get over that awesome feeling of compassion that that experience gave me since before my disease I would have judged (and not helped) that man.  Every day I feel grateful that for the first time in my life I understand there are people who will never be in a position to take care of themselves.  

Without having experienced the inexplicable chronic fatigue that came (and persists) with my disease, I would have never felt the warmth of compassion. How strange life is.  I was given such a wonderful thing by such an awful (and freaky) disease.

Every time I see my lung doctor (pulmonologist), I thank him for saving my life.  I should be thanking him for the gift of compassion….

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The best part about surviving a (potentially) fatal disease is not life – it’s compassion.

It is time to get rid of the 3-point shot and increase the shot clock

When I watch games from 20 years ago from the 80s and even into the 90s, it’s hard not to think that basketball was better — and a lot more interesting — then.  

Teams ran more, they passed better, they dunked more, there were more “oooohhhh” type moments where a person would make an impossible move and shot, and it was just more interesting.  

Teams passed to the post more, then when defenses cheated they took longer shots, and the goal was to race up the court before a defense could set up. Some teams had a physical center, some teams had the fast break and most had a mixture.  There was (ironically) more action and more variety.  

Now teams penetrate, kick it out to 1 of 3 or 4 players posted along the 3 point line and fire up three pointers.  

It’s not much more interesting than watching a shooting clinic, in my opinion.  When all shots are 2 pointers, and when the shot clock is 45 minutes, it actually generates more diversity and creativity.

It is time to get rid of the 3-point shot and increase the shot clock

Never Tire of “Survive and Advance…”

I love the ESPN documentary of the 1983 NC State National Championship.  Inspiring, touching, interesting, funny, and nostalgic all at the same time. I watched it this evening for perhaps the 10th time hoping it would improve my fatigue — it didn’t work, but at least I enjoyed the film ­čÖé

Never Tire of “Survive and Advance…”

Hit a wall today

After several weeks of chaos at work (layoffs, reorgs, consolidations, countless corporate conference calls), fielding calls from headhunters (due to all the chaos at work), meeting suitors for pre-and-post work meetings, a string of family birthdays/gatherings, interviewing/hiring new AEs atop of the usual work stress, I hit a wall today.  I came home early, put on my pajamas, and planted my butt on the couch. Here is hoping I feel better soon! The question is, with all the chaos at work, how can I possible recharge the batteries anytime soon??

Hit a wall today

Why the heck do sales organizations hold Sales Reps accountable for metrics *and* results? Madness…

I can see holding Sales Reps accountable to Metrics.  And I can see holding them accountable for results.  But increasingly, I see them held accountable for both.  So a poor Sales Rep is forced to do micro activities that often interfere with their plan, then are fired for a lack of results if those activities don’t produce results.  For example, my reps must make a certain number of phone calls, have a certain number of meetings and a certain number of leads — or they are fired.  Plus, these have to result in revenue targets — or they are fired.  Not to mention the endless number of Corporate conference calls, HQ visits, etc. etc.  

It is madness.  Why do enforce one or the other?  What is the point?

Why the heck do sales organizations hold Sales Reps accountable for metrics *and* results? Madness…

In the 80s and 90s, we had the most awesome search engine(s) ever – a filing clerk and a brain.

When I needed a file, I would spend 30 seconds filling out a pink form with the approximate name of the file, I would drop it in our filing clerk’s “in” box, go to lunch, and arrive back from lunch to find the file on my desk.  If anything was critical, I’d photocopy it and put it in my binder on my desk.  Because all of this had been manual, it was ingrained in my memory and I could always find that document in my binder with just a few seconds of thumbing through papers.

I never had to wait for the binder to reboot.  I never was told I couldn’t access my binder.  And the filing clerk — because she was great at her job — never ever came back with irrelevant files.  And combing through a paperfile wasn’t an unpleasant process – in fact, I’d see a lot of interesting things I didn’t expect in various files.  

And because no one had ever heard of the word “on demand,” the time it took to find this file didn’t feel frustrating or unnatural.  And I didn’t have people expecting me to reply to their memo or phone message in 2 minutes.

In the 80s and 90s, we had the most awesome search engine(s) ever – a filing clerk and a brain.